Monday, December 6, 2010

Learning Together: WISE 2010


Learning Together.

Today as we began the second day at the Learners' Voice programme with a visit to Qatar's Education City. The meeting with Dr Danny Robert , Assistance VP, Faculty and Student Services was revealing and though-challenging. It was a meeting that not only inspired me but challenges me and   one idea keep hitting my heart, Bam Bam!!!  and it to Find a where to collaborate and create opportunity for learning together, learning that transcends boarders, that inspires and create a growing need for innovation among personal learners in a learning community

According to Wikipedia, A learning community is a group of people who share common values and beliefs, are actively engaged in learning together from each other. Such communities have become the template for a cohort-based, interdisciplinary approach to higher education.

Learning together with a vision for action can lead to a better world. During the brainstorming for a vision for the future of the Learners' Voice, Indee thotawattage from Sri Lanka said “Todays Local personal Learners, Tomorrow’s global interconnected world" a statement I believe expresses the connectedness between learners which I couldn’t agree more. \

So I raised a question on my facebook wall, asking undergrad and Post grad student to comment on how the learn and if connecting with a fellow student in a different culture/country help them learn better. The comments I received indicated interest for peer learning exchange. The reason being that some Student are privileged to have access to all the better learning environment with support from family and communities while other are not so fortunate. To bridge the gap student can get inspiration through connecting with other student who are studying similar course in another county/community and learn mostly through online technology.

Vinny from New Zealand said today that We should explore the advantage of peer pressure where learning becomes personal/connecting and learners can peer review themselves as sometime we have situation of “Knowledge Vs Skills”

So for me, as we explore the theme of New ways of Learning, my individual aim well be to explore the opportunity of creating a platform for action where Student in Nigeria can connect and collaborating with students from Qatar, Romania and Korea to become better learners and share global best practices

Learners’ success in developing high levels of skills, knowledge and understanding depends upon them experiencing effective and engaging learning and teaching.


..Second World Innovative Summit for Education (WISE2010)

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

NYCC WINS LEAP AFRICA AWARDS 2010

Meet the 2010 Winners of the LEAP Africa Nigerian Youth Leadership Awards!
Curred from CP-Africa

Its 2010 Annual Nigerian Youth Leadership Awards at the Muson Center, Lagos. Sponsored by the Ford Foundation, the event was well attended with Lagos State Governor, Babatunde Fashola and Former EFCC Chairman, Mallam Nuhu Ribadu serving as the event’s key note speakers. At this year’s event, five young Nigerians were recognized for implementing “social change projects with significant impact” in their local communities. Get inspired! Read all about the change projects of this year’s winners below!

Esther Agbarakwe, Age 26
Initiative: Nigerian Youth Climate Coalition (NYCC)
esther CPA Awards: Meet the 2010 Winners of the LEAP Africa Nigerian Youth Leadership Awards! 
Esther Kelechi Agbarakwe is a graduate of Chemistry from the University of Calabar whose passion for environmental sustainability inspired her to initiate Nigerian Youth Climate Coalition (NYCC). NYCC is made up of a group of young Nigerians who are providing solutions to the climate change crisis. Acting locally and internationally, they combine forces to organize programmes, influence government and implement concrete solutions. NYCC works in schools and communities across Nigeria, empowering young people to create solutions for climate change. As a result, the initiative provides a robust platform where youth led organizations working on sustainable environmental issues interact and learn from each other. This strengthens their coordination and gives them a united voice to address climate change issues, as it affects the socio-economic growth and development of Nigeria.

In an effort to empower youth, NYCC held an “Awareness to Action” programme in partnership with similar organizations to train 40 youth between the ages of 18 and25 years on the process of recycling paper. At the end of the training, 10 beneficiaries received Paper recycling equipment to recycle paper for production of paper products including greeting cards and picture frames.

Through NYCC Esther has educated over one thousand five hundred (1500) youth through peer group training and online social networks on climate change issues. NYCC is currently collaborating with Building Nigeria’s Response to Climate Change (BNRCC) to implement a Climate Change Youth Communication Project to increase its reach to more Nigerian youth. Esther was recently selected as the Nigerian representative for the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Commission on Education and Communication In addition, she represented Nigeria at United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Seventh African Development Forum (ADVII) and Young Commonwealth  Climate Change  Fellowship 2010. Esther is a 2009 Dekeyser & Friends Foundation Fellow. She also belongs to several environmental and youth organizations.

The five winners will receive the sum of N100,000 apiece to support their works in local communities. Ms Layode, Excutive director of LEAP Africa revealed that the awardees would receive the cash prize “after they have submitted their proposals on the projects they want to carry out,” adding the organisation “will continue to reward excellence wherever it is found.” The LEAP Africa award was launched in 2004. The award is supported with funding from the Ford Foundation.

For more information on Nigerian Youth Climate Coalition (NYCC), please contact Esther at esther.agbarakwe@youthclimate.org.uk; donestyc@gmail.com 


please visit www.nigycc.org for more infor about NYCC
 
 
http://www.cp-africa.com/2010/11/22/cpa-awards-meet-2010-winners-nigerian-youth-leadership-awards/ 
 

Commonwealth youth speak out on Climate Change

Written by Commonwealth Secretariat, London
17 November 2010


Activists from six Commonwealth countries meet to develop toolkit for advocacy
A coalition of young climate change activists are meeting in London this week to develop a toolkit for young Commonwealth citizens to engage in climate change education and advocacy.

The event follows last year’s successful launch of the Young Climate Change Initiative Network to build the capacity of young activists across the Commonwealth.

‘People under 30 are extremely concerned about the impact of climate change in their countries. It is their future at stake, but there is broad consensus that young people’s voices are not being heard on this issue,’ says Layne Robinson, Programme Officer at the Commonwealth Secretariat.

The YCCI brings together young people with expertise on climate change issues in their countries and regions. The aim of this initiative is for them to share experiences and produce a practical learning resource for other young people.
It will provide guidance on key resources and networks and will include se
ctions on issues relevant to climate change, such as gender, food security, water, sanitation and human rights.

Young activists from India, Sierra Leone, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Trinidad and Tobago and Nigeria yesterday gave their views on climate change:

‘Climate change is very important. The evidence is that young people will inherit the climate system which the government decides to leave. Young people have the skills and knowledge. If only they are given the opportunity.’ – Taiwo Oyelakin (Nigeria).

‘Climate change is an immediate threat. It is not a future phenomenon for which we need to be thinking about and preparing for. It is here and now. And it is here and now that we must make this our important priority, globally.’ – Alicia Crawford (Australia).

‘We are not fighting the climate, not saving the planet. We are battling our own survival. Let’s wake up to the consistent signals of nature and work together for our future. Climate change is real.’ – Rishab Khanna (India)

‘Climate change is a global phenomenon. The enormity of the effects will only be fully experienced in a few years from now. As a people, we owe it to ourselves to take action now. Change the way we consume, the treatment of our ecosystems, our impacts on the environment and as such, our livelihoods. This way, we can combat the effects on our future.’ – Nolana E Lynch (Trinidad and Tobago)

‘We all know climate change is about human survival and human prosperity. But it’s about human rights, too. So as young people, let’s start by fighting for our right to a better climate. We need practical actions, not words. We call on world leaders to take responsibility now and think about our climate rights as a global agenda for all.’ – Messeh Kamara (Sierra Leone).

‘When you believe in doing something for climate change, just do it and don’t expect the outcomes of it and the best outcome will come to you’ – Y.Komalirani (India)
‘For a future tomorrow, let us preserve our environment today.’ – Garvin Perry, (Trinidad and Tobago).

‘It’s our time, our future. Keep the planet safe. Stop climate change.’ – Esther Agbarakwe (Nigeria).

‘Young people are the world’s largest untapped resource. We have the ideas, energy, and commitment to justice that will solve climate change.’ – Casper ter Kuile (United Kingdom).

‘Our generation is already suffering from the impacts of the on-going financial crisis. Let’s not allow an ecological crisis to get to the same point.’ – Sarah-Jane Saska, (Canada).

‘We are here. We are the young generation. We are strong. We are a voice. Speak through us and we can carry the voice. Climate change. A change for your people and the young generation. Think climate.’ – Timothy Sam (Sierra Leone).

http://www.thecommonwealth.org/news/231857/171110youthclimatechange.htm

Monday, August 2, 2010

Reports on Earth Charter +10 Event

I attended the Earth Charter's 10th anniversary event at the Peace Palace, the Hague from June 27th to 29th, 2010. The Earth Charter is a declaration of fundamental ethical principles for building a just, sustainable and peaceful global society in the 21st century. It seeks to inspire in all people a new sense of global interdependence and shared responsibility for the well-being of the whole human family, the greater community of life, and future generations. It is a vision of hope and a call to action.

The event brought together people from all sectors and parts of the world to engage in dialogue, to collaborate and reflect on 10 years of the Earth Charter and the future steps towards a sustainable future.
Over 200 participants attended this event, including EC Commissioners, Affiliates, members of the International Council, youth leaders and many partners. The event had the honour of having the participation of Queen Beatrix of The Netherlands and Prime Minister Balkenende. In his address, the Prime Minister said that "the art can change your life and that he would never forget the music he heard here today", and he compared the EC movement with a tree that has been growing, although not as much (and fast) as it should, but he hopes it will continue to grow until its leaves cover the whole world.

This was a wonderful occasion for participants to learn from each other and get extra portion of inspiration. A special feature was to have Minister of Culture and Youth of Costa Rica, Manuel Obregon, play parts of his concert "Symbiosis" and also to have a "Concert of the plants" led by Macaco Tamerice. The event was convened by Ruud Lubbers and was organized by NCDO in cooperation with the ECI Secretariat.
I was invited to speak at the Earth Charter Session on UN, Global Governance and Climate Change with speaker like Yolanda Kababadse, former IUCN chair and WWF president.

It was an inspiring event for me and I got home with a backpack full of knowledge and inspiration to engage for a peaceful and sustainable future in Nigeria.

Through the Nigerian Youth Climate Coalition (NYCC), I am currently planing to hold a Youth Dialogue on Climate change tagged: 'Our Year, Our Voice' to prepare for COP16 and to celebrate the International Year of Youth, which runs August 2010-2011.

Esther Agbarakwe
IUCN CEC- Nigeria

Friday, July 23, 2010

When Climate Change Becomes a Health Issue, Are People More Likely to act and Listen?

So I posted this question  on my facebook wall and ask" Folks what do you think? This were the comments and contributions:( Me, Akinfenwa Akintola, Adewole Taiwo, Tijah Bolton-Akpan and 2 others like this on my facebook wall.)

@Esther: -Framing climate change as a public health problem seems to make the issue more relevant, significant and understandable to members of the public -- even some who don't generally believe climate change is happening, according to preliminary research by George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication (4C). What do you say folks?

@Olumide Idowu: Yes dear, I saw a leaflet in one of your office. The one upstairs talking about Climate Change and our Health. Pls Pick one and read. How u doing?

@Esther: @olu..yes I have already, I want to know what you think critically

Hafiz Afolabi Salaam: This is getting interesting. I used to have this notion that climate change was discussed at UN meetings and Developed naions. Discussing it 9ja is nice but what can be taken to tackle it. I believe taking it from here will be better.Then from the action more people will buy into it

@Esther:@Afolabi..Climate change is a global issue but requires both global and local action. As young people, we need to get informed about the causes, impact and how to adapt to the effect. we also need to change our lifestyles towards a sustainable one. Reuse, reduce and recycle..isnt that simple enough? let hear your thought!

Olumide Idowu Emmanuel:This is becoming interesting. Esther we are already in a dialogue table now. I think our event will give an oversight to the issue itself. What do u think?

Grace Mwaura: @ Esther, climate change is a Health issue, especially in Africa as we talk about the 2nd most dangerous disease Malaria, whose prevalence has increased with the increase in temperatures. In Africa, climate change also links with food security which is a major factor when you talk about the health of a country. I am currently working on a healthy ... See Morelearning programme in primary schools in dry lands of Kenya and these are challenges i encounter everyday. Whereas the layman may not directly link his/her health status to climate change, we the climate change experts should be able to derive this from our research work, our daily encounters and address the issues amicably. Its a fact, and people will listen: When you talk of Health: Nutrition and temperate diseases. BEST!

UnyimeAbasi Essien:We can take simple steps, like tree planting - to mitigate effects of climate change in our immediate environment and create awareness to people in local areas on the effect of climate change, which ongoing unnoticed
Grace Mwaura: @ Unyime, Very true: But look at a case where local communities do this for years and years, but still at the government level, we lack the political will and capacity to have proper strategies put in place to respond to climate change. And so we end up having endless dirty industries that continue to emit, our transport systems still use fossil ... See Morefuels,and our energy sector is still dependent on fossils and hydro power.Where the government fails to control industrial development and provide basic amenities to citizens especially the 'vulnerable' so that they are able to respond to the CC impacts. Especially in Africa, i find the efforts of both the communities and government equally important and complementing each other.
Firstly, i do think we need to invest much more as a continent in the Education, and Healthy Systems so that the population has enough capacity, knowledge and skills to respond to climate change: EDUCATION is key to solving health and climate change issues.
Hafiz Afolabi Salaam: No matter what we discuss government buy in is very key.We need to make sure government partake in this cause. Also our livestyles as youths and individuals go along way too. What do we do with usd items do we just throw it outside ( afterall its the cleaner or street sweeper job to clean the environment! Hell NO!). So our lifetsyle to wate ... See Moremangement is what I woul want us to emphasize so that we can take it from there because this has to do with us directly first before we can then tell the government to put stern policies to curb this. Good discussion Esther keep it up.
Esther Agbarakwe: @ Grace, EDUCATION IS KEY..I agree. Yesterday at a Post COP15 Workshop on Gender and Climate Change, I saw really lack of knowledge and capacity even among the "elders' at all sectors..so for young people, we must continue our PEER EDUCATION using what ever platform and learning from success stories-Kenya. this is what NYCC is doing.
Esther Agbarakwe: @Afolabi..We're blessed to have access to technology and platform like FB and we must use it wisely...educate, advocate and lead by example. at home we must reduce, and reuse and try to recycle (it very possible) then then other will see and get informed and inspired.IT START WITH ONE!
Chike Igweobi:May I throw in my thoughts!
@Esther: This an important topic and I am happy you're really taking the lead on peer education around debates like this one. And yes, people are already listening because the tie between climate change and health problems are becoming clearer with each passing day.
@Grace: I would agree with you that there's a strong co... See More-relation between Climate Change, and Community/Public Health. Many researchers have tied environmental dynamics of recent times with health problems. In fact, climate change has become an important topic in Health Disparity!
Changing climate, and particularly increase in tropical temperatures, all have been found to support the replication of parasitic organism leading to more infections. Again, drop in annual rain-fall leading to drought has also been tied to reduction in crop production....which of course is directly related to malnutrition.
So, all of these issues are intertwined. 
Hafiz Afolabi Salaam:I will like this discussion to go towards what we can do as youths in the short time like within months then in the next year so that we can create a new map for climate change in Nigeria. For me I still stick to educating youths on the effects of polluting the environment o their health and lifetsyles as a short time measure to curb the effects of... See More climate change.Taking example from lagos if everyone dispose their wastes very well I am sure the issue of flodding be will be half solved because you notice that most drains in lagos when cleared is always filled with debries that people put in there. So lets here more 
thoughts on this
Esther Agbarakwe: @Afrolabi..I support PEER EDUCATION for now as we need to get more youths informed and inspired. It start with you and I.
Hafiz Afolabi Salaam:I am glad this is all tending to a conclusion. Now we should all start breaking the pipeline if there is any that may aid peer education towards a better and friendly environmet where health and well being will be guranteed.The first issue I would want discussed is attitudinal change. We need to start craving for a better environment through all our activities anywhere we found ourself. I support reuse and recyle!What about you?
Adegbite Oluwadara:the cost of ignoring climate change has been estimated at more than that of the two world wars and the great depression. Before the late 1800's, average surface temperature was almost 15'C. But, it's frightening to note that over the past hundred years, this temperature has risen by about 0.7'C with the most increase occurring since 1970's. Also, ... See Morethe area of the world stricken by drought has doubled between 1970 and the early 2000s. In Africa, fertile land is already turning to desert. By 2020, climate change is predicted to reduce some African farming harvest by 50 percent. In years to come, unpredictable rainfall, together with rising sea levels and higher sea temperatures will lead to more frequent storms, floods and droughts. there is no better time to rise to the task of combating climate change than NOW!!!
Emmanuel Odiase:Preach it, lets see what it becomes....lol 
Felix Ukam Ngwu:You cannot isolate the two. Our health and well being depend on our environment. Whether we are healthy or not depends on this current realities. The implication of climate change on health should therefore be taken very seriously.
Grace Mwaura: @ ALL! Fanstastic and Great contributions! I am, happy to read of what has been happening in Nigeria. What else after Education, attituge change. ACTION. Its time for African youth to arise to action. I like the suggestion of developing short term and long terms solutions to this.
(Will blog this conversation! Its so interesting!)
Esther Agbarakwe: @Grace..bloging? you just read my mind. @ALL Meanwhile we have a book project that NYCC is working on. We will share more info on the NYCC Page., ATTITUDE CHANGE AND ACTION!!!!

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Bamako Declaration on the Environment for Sustainable Development

We, the African Ministers of Environment,


Having met in Bamako from 23 to 25 June 2010 at the thirteenth session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment,

Recognizing and appreciating the Conference’s contribution in providing political guidance and leadership on environmental management to Africa since its creation in 1985 in Cairo,

Noting with appreciation the support provided by the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, the Global Environment Facility and other partners for environmental programmes in Africa,

Expressing appreciation for the role of all partners, including the African Union Commission, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, in supporting the African regional preparatory process for the eighteenth session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development, at which representatives considered the thematic cluster on chemicals, waste management, transport, mining and sustainable consumption and production,

Mindful that the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development will focus at its twentieth session on, among other matters, the thematic cluster of forests, biodiversity, biotechnology, tourism and mountains, to which Africa should provide collective inputs and in which it should participate effectively,

Mindful also that the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2012, and that Africa will need to embark on a regional preparatory process to that end to ensure the continent’s readiness and effective participation,

Recognizing the need to take advantage of the opportunities provided by a growth and development trajectory that embraces the green economy model,

Noting the progress made in the implementation of decision 6, on environmental education and technology supported learning, of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment at its twelfth session,

Acknowledging the outcomes of the summit of Heads of State and Government of sub Saharan countries related to the creation of a Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel pan-African agency, held in N’Djamena from 15 to 17 June 2010, with the aim of combating desertification and poverty, restoring degraded land and conserving biological diversity,

Recognizing the cooperation with non-governmental and civil society organizations in implementing the programme of work of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment,

Affirming the important role that young people, the private sector, other major groups and civil society play in sustainable development, and the need for their effective involvement in driving Africa’s sustainable development agenda,

Welcoming the adoption on 1 April 2010 by the Conference of Plenipotentiaries of the Amended Convention for the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment for the Western Indian Ocean and the Protocol for the Protection of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Western Indian Ocean from Land-based Sources and Activities,

Welcoming also the forthcoming seventh African Development Forum, to be held in October 2010 in Addis Ababa under the overall theme of “Acting on climate change for sustainable development in Africa”, organized by the African Union Commission, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, the United Nations Environment Programme and the African Development Bank, in collaboration with all stakeholders and partners,

Welcoming further the outcome of the pan-African ministerial conference that took place in Windhoek from 8 to 10 March 2010 with the aim of preparing an African common position for the access and benefit-sharing round of negotiations held in Cali, Colombia, in March 2010;

Expressing appreciation for the outcome of the special session on climate change of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, held in Nairobi from 25 to 29 May 2009, at which agreement was reached, in the form of the Nairobi Declaration on the African Process for Combating Climate Change, on the Conference’s work on climate change in Africa as a platform to discuss the issue and shape a shared vision and common position to combat its adverse effects and achieve sustainable development,

Reaffirming the importance of the Africa Environment Outlook process as a framework to support decision-making for the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, Governments and other stakeholders and, in that regard, lauding efforts to prepare the third Africa Environment Outlook report and welcoming the participation of the World Health Organization in that process,

Taking note of the omnibus decision simultaneously adopted by the conferences of the parties to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal, the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade and the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants at their extraordinary meetings held in Bali, Indonesia, from 22 to 24 February 2010,

Recognizing the strong commitment of African countries to disaster risk reduction and the development of meteorology that was renewed at the first conference of ministers responsible for meteorology in Africa, held in Nairobi from 12 to 16 April 2010, and at the second African ministerial conference on disaster risk reduction, held in Nairobi from 14 to 16 April 2010, bearing in mind the close relationship between climate change, natural disasters and meteorology,

Noting the importance of the environmentally sound management of chemical products and wastes in environmental management for sustainable development,

Commending the role played by African countries in strengthening intra-African consultations and coordination by articulating common African positions in multilateral negotiation processes on climate change, biological diversity and sustainable development, such as the African climate platform prepared in Algiers and updated and adopted by the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment in Nairobi, by which African countries agreed on a common position for the climate change negotiations, in addition to the common African position on access and benefit-sharing,

Considering the vital importance of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation and the need to increase the absorption of carbon dioxide by forests,

Reaffirming that adaptation is the priority for Africa and that there is an urgent need for immediate support for the continent’s implementation of adaptation measures,

Aware of the contribution of the Global Biodiversity Outlook process to the future of the environmental management in Africa,

Welcoming the review of the implementation of the action plan for the environment initiative of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development by the Planning and Coordinating Agency of that body, the African Union Commission and the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, with the support of the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and other partners, in the context of the United Nations regional coordination mechanism in support of the African Union and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development,

Noting that the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme in 2009 established, by its decision 25/4, a regionally representative, consultative group of ministers or high-level representatives to consider options for broader reform of the current international environmental governance system and to present their inputs to the United Nations General Assembly,

Welcoming the outcome of the third ad hoc intergovernmental and multi-stakeholder meeting on an intergovernmental science-policy platform for biodiversity and ecosystem services held in Busan, Republic of Korea, from 7 to 11 June 2010, at which Governments, as requested by the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme through its decision SS.XI/4, concluded that an intergovernmental science-policy platform for biodiversity and ecosystem services should be established to strengthen the science-policy interface for biodiversity and ecosystem services for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, long-term human well being and sustainable development,

Taking note of the forthcoming high-level meeting of the United Nations General Assembly on biodiversity, to be held in September 2010, the fifth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, to be held in Nagoya, Japan, from 11 to 15 October 2010, and, in particular, the tenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, to be held immediately after the aforementioned meeting, at which representatives will consider, among others, the Strategic Plan for the Convention on Biological Diversity and targets for 2011–2020 and the adoption of an international legally binding regime on access and benefit sharing,

Aware of the severe effects of climate change caused by the desiccation of Lake Chad,

Mindful of the holding of the resumed ninth meeting of the Ad Hoc Open-ended Working Group on Access and Benefit-sharing in Montreal, Canada, from 10 to 16 July 2010, and of the conference on the theme of “Bolstering biodiversity in Africa: everyone’s problem and heritage” that took place in Libreville on 2 and 3 June 2010,

Noting that, by its resolution 62/195 of 17 December 2007, the United Nations General Assembly decided to declare the decade 2010–2020 as the United Nations Decade for Deserts and the Fight against Desertification,

Noting also that, by its resolution 61/203 of 20 December 2006, the United Nations General Assembly declared 2010 the International Year of Biodiversity, and that the thirteenth session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment is one of the flagship activities organized in Africa under the Year,

Noting further that, by its resolution 61/193 of 20 December 2006, the United Nations General Assembly decided to declare 2011 the International Year of Forests,

Recognizing the importance of African ecosystem research networks as long-term ecological infrastructure to support ecosystem management, sustainable livelihood and climate change in Africa,

Welcoming the Ouagadougou Declaration of the seventh World Forum on Sustainable Development, held in Ouagadougou from 9 to 11 October 2009,

Expressing appreciation for the efforts and support of all partners to promote environmental management for sustainable development in Africa,

Hereby declare our resolve:

1. To commit ourselves to reinforcing and to implementing decisions by the African Union and the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment to ensure and guarantee the coherence, transparency, continuity and effectiveness of the political and legal representation of Africa in the process of negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol thereto;

2. Also to commit ourselves to continuing the strengthening of the common negotiating position for a comprehensive international climate change regime to enable the full, effective and sustained implementation of the Framework Convention on Climate Change through the implementation of the comprehensive framework of African climate change programmes, and also to call upon African Governments to support the process actively;

3. To call upon countries to take steps to tackle issues afflicting vulnerable groups, in particular those attributable to climate change;

4. To participate in the Libreville meeting to finalize a common position on biodiversity with a view to the tenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity;

5. To urge African States to adopt and implement an ecosystem-based approach to adaptation to tackle and mitigate the impacts of climate change and to urge all multilateral and bilateral partners to support such implementation;

6. To call upon the United Nations Environment Programme and other multilateral partners to support the mobilization of financial resources for the Adaptation Fund of the Kyoto Protocol and to support African countries in gaining access to resources under the various climate related funds;

7. To accelerate the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005–2015 and the programme of action for the implementation of the African regional strategy for disaster risk reduction (2005–2015) to increase the continent’s resilience to the negative impacts of climate change;

8. To call upon countries to prepare innovative projects in order to scale up their environmental efforts and to benefit from the Clean Development Mechanism and other carbon markets;

9. To call upon United Nations agencies, the African Union Commission, the Planning and Coordinating Agency of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development and other partners to support the development of a strategic approach to reducing deforestation and land degradation in all ecological areas, especially in semi-arid and arid regions of Africa;

10. To call upon countries to prepare national adaptation plans to cover immediate, short-term, medium-term and long-term needs, taking into consideration coordination and cooperation for adaptation actions that have a cross-border effect;

11. To call upon the United Nations and other multilateral and bilateral stakeholders to respond to country and industry needs for what is known as “climate-finance readiness support” to enable the implementation of the Clean Development Mechanism and clean technology projects;

12. To support the convening of the seventh African Development Forum, which will focus on climate change, and to urge all stakeholders and partners to participate effectively in its organization and the subsequent implementation of its outcomes;

13. Also to support the establishment of an African ecosystems research network that would enhance the capacity of scientists and policymakers in the sustainable management of ecosystems and livelihoods in Africa;

14. To request developed countries and partners to increase their financial support for the implementation of processes relating to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, including agriculture and land management (what is known as “REDD-plus”), in particular, the second phase of the REDD-plus programme;

15. To request international organizations, developed countries and all partners to increase their support for the implementation of adaptation strategies and programmes in Africa and to provide full support for the implementation of the national adaptation programmes of action prepared by least developed countries in Africa;

16. To commit ourselves to developing a common position for the continuing negotiations on liability, compensation and redress regimes under the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Cartagena Protocol and to call upon the African Union and the United Nations Environment Programme to support African negotiators in the negotiation of a new international regime on access and benefit-sharing;

17. To commit ourselves to the African common position on the continuing negotiations on access and benefit-sharing, as endorsed at the pan-African ministerial conference on the subject that took place in Windhoek from 8 to 10 March 2010;

18. To call upon States to support at the national, subregional, regional and global levels the process to establish an intergovernmental science-policy platform for biodiversity and ecosystem services, to be considered by the General Assembly of the United Nations at its sixty-fifth session;

19. To commit ourselves to implement activities in the framework of the celebration of the 2010 International Year on Biodiversity and those recommended in the third Global Biodiversity Outlook report;

20. To invite the international community to take the necessary measures to prevent accidents that could result from biotechnological risks and to ensure the restoration of the environment in cases where such accidents occur;

21. To invite the African Union Commission and the Planning and Coordinating Agency of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development, with the continued support of the secretariat of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa, the Global Mechanism of that Convention, the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Development Programme, the Global Environment Facility and other partners, to implement the 10-year strategic plan and framework to enhance the implementation of the Convention (2008–2018);

22. To invite African countries to produce and implement national action programmes in the context of the celebration of the United Nations Decade for Deserts and the Fight against Desertification (2010–2020);

23. To reinforce shared actions by African countries to mobilize the required financial resources for the implementation of the Convention to Combat Desertification and national action plans;

24. To urge partners, the African Union Commission and United Nations agencies to support the development and implementation of the Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel pan-African agency and other similar subregional initiatives with the constant support of the global mechanisms under the Rio Conventions;

25. To strengthen consultations and coordination between African representatives at the Council of the Global Environment Facility to ensure that greater attention is paid to and increased financial resources made available for efforts to combat desertification and soil and forest degradation, in particular in Africa, in the context of the fifth replenishment of the Global Environment Facility;

26. To urge countries to seek ways and opportunities to strengthen synergies in the implementation of the conventions on climate change, desertification and biodiversity at the national, subregional and global levels in support of sustainable development for Africa, notably through the development of joint programmes of work;

27. To call for the development of a regional forum for synergies between the Rio conventions, to support the development of regional project proposals, through the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment;

28. To request the secretariats of the Rio conventions to explore the possibility of elaborating a joint programme of work with a view to using resources efficiently and to present such a programme at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, in 2012;

29. To commit ourselves to the effective implementation of the Convention to Combat Desertification at the national, subregional and regional levels;

30. Also to commit ourselves to strengthening the African group’s position during the international negotiations under the Convention to Combat Desertification and for the promotion of sustainable land management within other relevant international processes, such as forums on climate change, biodiversity and sustainable development;

31. To request the secretariats of the Convention to Combat Desertification and the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment to establish a formal partnership with a clear road map, based on relevant objectives and targets to be achieved and activities to be undertaken, to support the mainstreaming of sustainable land management and desertification, land degradation and drought into national development policies, strategies and programmes and to strengthen the African group’s positions regarding sustainable land management in relevant processes;

32. To urge countries to support and promote the integrated management of river basins;

33. To support the implementation of the Libreville Declaration of the Inter-Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in Africa, held in Libreville in August 2008, and to participate in the second such conference, to be held in Luanda from 23 to 26 November 2010;

34. To request the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Health Organization, working with other partners, to support the implementation of the Libreville Declaration, including through the development of strategic alliances between the health and environment sectors and of joint plans of action;

35. To request the African Union Commission, together with the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and other partners, to support the convening in 2011 of the first meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Bamako Convention on the Ban of the Import into Africa and the Control of Transboundary Movement and Management of Hazardous Wastes within Africa;

36. To call upon those States that have not yet done so swiftly to ratify in 2010 the Bamako Convention and all other chemicals and wastes conventions;

37. To call upon the African Union Commission and States to develop a mechanism for a common position in the continuing negotiations under the intergovernmental negotiating committee to prepare a global legally binding instrument on mercury;

38. To call upon States individually or collectively to develop strategies or mechanisms to ban or control the trade and importation into Africa of electronic waste, including through the development of strategies for the sustainable management of electronic waste;

39. To call upon countries to continue supporting the implementation of declarations, multilateral environmental agreements on hazardous substances and wastes and all relevant instruments, including the Bali Declaration on Waste Management for Human Health and Livelihood, adopted at the ninth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Basel Convention, held in Bali from 23 to 27 June 2008;

40. To call upon all stakeholders and partners to support the implementation of the outcomes of the Africa review implementation meeting on chemicals, waste management, mining, transport and sustainable consumption and production, held in Addis Ababa in October 2009, and the Africa-related priority actions on these thematic clusters of issues identified at the eighteenth session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, and also to ensure that Africa’s concerns and priorities are effectively articulated during the review session on the same in May 2011;

41. To call upon States to promote the implementation of the decision adopted by the conferences of the parties to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm conventions at their extraordinary meetings, held in Bali from 22 to 24 February 2010, and to invite the United Nations Environment Programme, the Food and Agriculture of the United Nations, the World Health Organization, the World Bank, the Global Environment Facility and other relevant international organizations to support African countries in programmatic cooperation and coordination at the national level for the implementation of that decision;

42. To request the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme, the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and the Director General of the World Heath Organization, in partnership with the African Union Commission and others, to support and participate in the preparation of the third Africa Environment Outlook report and in the implementation of the policy options set forth in that report;

43. To urge all countries to participate in the development of the Pan-Africa e-Learning for the Environment Network by designating national environmental education e-learning centres and by developing e learning strategies for the environment sector;

44. To request the United Nations Environment Programme to ramp up its technology support and capacity-building interventions to support the development of the Network and to request all relevant stakeholders to mobilize resources for its future development;

45. To develop comprehensive information, education and communication strategies emphasizing the Rio conventions;

46. To urge the African Union Commission, together with the United Nations Environment Programme and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and other partners, to develop a marine and coastal environment strategy for Africa, taking into account the adverse impacts of climate change and the need to improve communities’ livelihoods;

47. To encourage countries to develop national and subregional strategies and action plans on climate change and the marine and coastal environment;

48. To urge States and relevant organizations to expedite the process of ratification, acceptance or approval and implementation of the Amended Convention for the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Western Indian Ocean and the Protocol for the Protection of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Western Indian Ocean from Land-Based Sources and Activities, adopted by a conference of plenipotentiaries on 1 April 2010;

49. To urge the United Nations Environment Programme and partners to support the implementation of the strategic action programme for the protection of the coastal and marine environment of the Western Indian Ocean from land-based sources and activities that was endorsed at the sixth meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention for the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Eastern African Region, held on 31 March 2010 in Nairobi;

50. To urge countries and relevant organizations to develop partnerships with potential beneficiaries of the Convention for Cooperation in the Protection and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the West and Central African Region with a view to mobilizing technical and financial resources for the implementation of the Convention;

51. To urge those States that have not yet done so to expedite their accession to the Convention for Cooperation in the Protection and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the West and Central African Region;

52. To call upon coastal States to support a mangrove ecosystem management project being led by the African Mangrove Network and funded by the Global Environment Facility;

53. To urge representatives at the joint annual meetings of the African Union Conference of Ministers of Economy and Finance and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa Conference of African Ministers of Finance, Planning and Economic Development to take specific steps in mainstreaming environmental issues in development planning;

54. To urge Africa’s development partners to support the African Union Commission, the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, the Planning and Coordination Agency of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development and the regional economic communities in implementing their environmental action plans;

55. To urge all countries, as a political commitment of the Heads of State of the African Union, to ratify or accede to and implement the Revised African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, in addition to other global and regional environmental conventions and agreements, including the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, as soon as possible;

56. To urge member States to take the necessary measures to ratify and implement the Revised African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources;

57. To call upon the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, the United Nations Environment Programme, other United Nations agencies, the African Union Commission, the African Development Bank, regional economic communities, African civil society organizations, other stakeholders and partners effectively to collaborate in the Africa preparatory process for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, with a view to ensuring that Africa’s concerns and priorities are effectively tackled in the Conference outcomes, including by means of the provision of adequate and appropriate support for the implementation of Africa’s sustainable development agenda;

58. To call upon the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, the United Nations Environment Programme, the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the World Tourism Organization, the African Union Commission, the African Development Bank, the regional economic communities, African civil society organizations, other stakeholders and partners to work together to ensure an effective regional preparatory process for the twentieth session of the Commission on Sustainable Development, at which representatives will consider, among others, the thematic cluster on forests, biodiversity, biotechnology, tourism and mountains, with a view to providing inputs that adequately reflect Africa’s concerns and priorities;

59. To encourage countries to strengthen synergies with other global and regional multilateral environmental agreements pertaining to biodiversity and the environment, such as the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, Especially as Waterfowl Habitat, the Convention on Migratory Species, the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds and the Basel Convention, in the implementation of the programme of work of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment;

60. To call upon the Planning and Coordinating Agency of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development, in collaboration with the secretariat of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, to facilitate the implementation of programmes under the action plan for the environment initiative and to support mechanisms for improved coordination of implementation;

61. To call upon the African Union Commission, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and the African Development Bank, within the context of the Climate for Development in Africa Programme, to work together with the United Nations Environment Programme, the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Convention to Combat Desertification, the Framework Convention on Climate Change and other partners to promote the synergistic implementation of the Rio conventions;

62. To call upon African civil society, the Pan-African Parliament, government institutions, including security agencies, and other stakeholders to support measures aimed at environmental management and protection;

63. To urge countries to continue to support processes to improve the international environment governance system;

64. To invite the secretariats of the relevant multilateral environmental agreements and programmes, including the Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Convention to Combat Desertification, the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Stockholm Convention, in partnership with the Global Environment Facility, to study the interlinkages between climate change, land degradation, persistent organic pollutants and other hazardous substances and wastes for a better understanding of their combined impacts on human well-being, biodiversity and ecosystems and to recommend specific measures targeted at reducing the vulnerability of affected groups and communities;

65. To continue to support the implementation of the TerrAfrica initiative for sustainable land management in sub-Saharan Africa;

66. To agree to hold an African summit on the green economy so as to support the mobilization of investments and accelerated economic growth alongside sustainable development;

67. To support the green economy initiative and to work with the United Nations Environment Programme and other partners in the process of reconfiguring businesses and infrastructure to deliver better returns on natural, human and economic capital investments while reducing greenhouse-gas emissions, enhancing the efficient use of natural resources, creating less waste and reducing social disparities;

68. To urge all countries to explore fully opportunities for building green economies, through, among other things, the development of clean technologies, renewable energies, water services, green transportation, waste management, green buildings and sustainable agriculture and forests;

69. To urge the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, the African Development Bank and the African Union Commission to undertake a study on the green economy in the context of poverty reduction and sustainable development within the framework of the preparatory process for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development;

70. To engage young people, civil society, the Pan-African Parliament and national assemblies, government institutions and other stakeholders constructively in supporting measures aimed at environmental management;

71. To urge Governments to take the necessary action to ensure that the general trust fund of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment is replenished during the intersessional period;

72. To mandate the President of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment to submit the report of the thirteenth session of the Conference, including the recommendations of the Bamako Declaration and its other annexes, to the Executive Council of the African Union;

73. To pay tribute to the President, Government and people of Mali for the warm welcome and the hospitality extended to participants, the excellent facilities made available and their generous support to the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment at its thirteenth session that contributed greatly to its success.

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Friday, June 4, 2010

Passion for Youth and Sustainabilty : Making right choices

Life and WORK
Life comes with it mysteries. when things happens, it just do. then suddenly 3 or more years has just passed and you begin to wonder what you had done in those years that can be describe as a "footprint".

I am very inspired by young people especially young people of Nigeria. Why? because there are the most sustainable resource a nation can have, and yet, they suffer a lot not because they want to, rather because they do not have the enabling environment to grow, express themselves and follow their dreams just like thier peers in Europe, America and some Africa countries.

Resigning from my old job was a challenging decision to make, after working for 3 month as a programme officer facilitating  Climate Change related research and activity. It time for me to go. off course there were many other issues that faciliated my decision  to quit! The Nigerian Youth Climate Movement needs tasolid foundation to engage in and participate fully in Climate change issues in Nigeria. After what happen in Copenhagen (very proud to have been a part of the global Youth Movement), the momentum was building around the world. Every facet of life were getting connected to the climate change issues and the outcome of the meeting in Bella center. Did this happened in Nigeria? where more young people getting involved and taking action on climate change?

NYCC:
Well, Let me answere the question. relatively yes.The Nigerian Youth Climate Coalition (NYCC) which I founded and co-directing, inspired by what happen in Copenahegen, was appraoched by Building Nigerian's Response to Climate Change (BNRCC) project to implement an 8th-month (April to Nov. 2010) Climate Change Youth Communication Project titled Engaging Niaja Youth in Climate Change Project. This is the major reason I resigned to help in building the Nigerian Youth Climate Movement. The broad objectives of the project are to provide young people with credible messages and access to further information on climate change and what they can do about it, with opportunities to make a difference, and with recognition and rewards for their work towards emissions reduction and adaption. Within the context of the BNRCC project, NYCC seek to mobilized, sensitized and build the capacity of 2000 youths as young climate Champions between the ages of 12 and 25 in Delta, Imo and Ondo states.  When completed, the project will provide Identified platforms to promote access to information on vulnerabilities, impacts and adaptation to climate change.

We will also be organising a Youth Media Dialogue on Climate Change on August 31st 2010. Bring two big forces together. Youth and Media to create a part for effective intergenerational Partnership and paradigm shift. The event will

Commonwealth Youth Climate Initaitve
I have aslo been busy. as a Commonwealth Youth Climate Initaive focal point for Nigeria, I was invited by the Commonwealth Youth Program(CYP) Office in Africa to help faciliate a Climate Change Session  during their African Regional Youth Caucus(RYC) meeting held in Abuja, March 2010. The objectives of the RYC Meeting are to provide an opportunity for young people to contribute to CYP’s policy and programme directions as well as use the opportunity to build capacity of young people in leadership and advocacy skills in key development to facilitate young people’s effective contribution to community and national development. One of the development areas that the RYC Meeting intends to focus on is Climate Change. The aim of the session is identify practical elements from Meeting communique/recommendations that young people can undertake as youth leaders to heighten advocacy and actions to address climate change issues at community/national levels.

UNFPA National Consulative Forum on young People:
UNFPA has always been on the forefront of promoting adolescent and young people health and development at all levels of development. Recently they collaborated with the Federal Ministries of Youth and Health to organise a National Consulative Forum for Advancing Young People's Health and Development in Abuja with the Theme: "Healthy Young People, Nigeria's Greatest Assest"  The broad objective was to create an action Plan for Advancing Young People Health and Development in Nigeria looking with active partciciption of young people. I was invited by UNFPA to present a Paper on "Fostering Youth Leadership and Partcipation in Decision Making"  During the Leadrship Session with some State Commissioners for  youth in attendance. My personal outcome of the meeting was inspiring the creation of "Youth For Action" Gorup which is aimed at faciliating further communiation among young people with constant and active youth enagagment in the implementation of the adopted Action Plan and the "Abuja Declaration".

2010Women  Deliver Conference .

My self and many peers arroud the world will be joining women activists, Media Celebrities like Christane Amanpour, Actoresses, UN system representatives and Men at the 2010 Women Deliver Conference in Washington from June 7th -9th 2010. holding  at the Walter E Washington DC Convention Center.
Women Deliver 2010, a global conference, will be held in Washington DC on June 7-9, 2010. The theme of the conference is: "Delivering solutions for girls and women," and we plan to focus on political, economic, social/cultural, and technological solutions. This global meeting will expand on Women Deliver's hallmark of inclusivity, reaching out to new partners and new communities. With all these partners in one room, we will further prove that maternal and reproductive health is a global priority. Women Deliver 2010 will move the dialogue to the global arena with two strong messages:
  • The MDGs will not be achieved without investing in women.
  • There is just enough time, if the world commits funding now, to achieve MDG5 — additional US$10 billion annually by 2010 and US$20 billion by 2015.
Personally, am heading to DC to understand fully the connection between Sexuality(women) and Sustainability(climate change). Although  UNFPA State of the World Population 2009 has already higlighted the connection. I need to hear personal stories and make connection.

Project A2A:
Last Year I spent 3 month in Schilersee, Bavaria Germany on a Youth interchange Fellowship Program designed to help young people recognize their strength and ability in order to follow their dreams organized by Dekeyer&Friends Foundation. at the end of the program, my dream plan was accepted for funding support. My dream is to see young Nigerians live sustainable lifystyle while engaging in local serivce project to protect the environment. Project A2A was launched on June 1st 2010 via  Making Dreams come True!!

Until we met again..My flight is waiting!!!

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Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Women and Climate Change in Nigeria

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Climate change policies must consider gender issues and women's involvement for the advancement of world development. Knowledge of climate change’s irrevocable damage is becoming more common and widely shared. In spite of this many of us are still stuck perceiving climate change as an environmental issue, distancing ourselves from the fact that we are completely dependent on the environment. Just like any other species, our survival is jeopardized by environmental degradation. It’s time to see climate change as what it essentially is, to us – a human issue. More than that, a human rights issue.

As the damage and depletion of the planet accelerates dangerously, the distinctly gendered repercussions of climate change are coming to the fore. Beyond the impact on all human beings, climate change is distinctly linked to women’s rights and gender justice, and is an urgent global issue that needs to be framed with attention to gender, due to its exacerbation of pre-existing inequalities.

As an Oxfam publication points out, “Climate change is not happening in a vacuum, but rather in the context of other risks, including economic liberalization, globalization, conflict, unpredictable government policies, and risks to health.” Although climate change reflects great injustices for both women and men, posing an increased threat to those suffering from poverty in developing nations – those who have ironically contributed the least to greenhouse gas emissions – 70 per cent of the 1.3 billion people living in extreme poverty around the world are female, according to Oxfam.
In Nigeria recently, I was involved in Building Nigerian Response to Climate Change (BRNCC)  project on "Assessmnet of Gender knowlegdge and Awareness, vulnerability and adaption strategies to impacts of climate change in Northern Nigeria" by Women Environmental Programme (WEP). I traveled to Kebbi state in North Western Nigeria on a field work based on the projecta and I got first-hand information on climate change vulnerability and impact on Women folks.  A male-dominated society like Nigeria, women also do most of the agricultural work, and are therefore affected by weather-related natural disasters impacting on food, energy and water.

From work in both drought prone and flood prone regions of Nigeria one of the consequences of climate variability one observes is the out migration of most of the able bodied male members.  The issue of climate refugees has been discussed at various levels but empirical data on its nature, social and gender impacts is perhaps inadequate.  

While we have been talking about the feminization of agriculture for some years, increased climate variability appears to be contributing to its pace and intensity.  This has implications on food productivity, land use policies, extension approaches, farm investments, our approach to farm mechanization etc.  As an example, small power tillers powered by bio diesel have been tried out in Kano and women find them very useful.  The reality is that now it is largely women who do agriculture and the approach of `Women extension workers’ as an adjunct to a male dominated service needs to be completely reviewed. 

Unfortunately women find a very small space in climate negotiations. Even when they are in such forum they get a 5 minute space to add some `colour and diversity’.  The serious business of negotiations and financing CC Adaptation & Mitigation is still the premise of hard nosed business men.
 Cycle of deprivation??
As a social development issue, climate change is pertinent to women’s equality.Our collective interaction with the environment affects every aspect of our existence as humans, so it’s crucial to explore how gender equality will be factored into the discussion as we move forward. The current climate crisis reflects issues of women’s disadvantage, such as access to resources and domestic responsibilities, and underscores the need for the inclusion of gender-based analysis in environmental problem solving and policy development.
We’re endangering our very survival by failing to curb limitless economic development, industrial expansion, insatiable use of resources, and the effects of global warming.

This estrangement from nature that allows humans to feel impervious is especially true of those of us who are far removed, in terms of geography and wealth, from the immediate consequences of global warming.

Climate change is no longer debatable; it is an undeniable fact. The time for governments and the international community to act is now
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